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Volunteer Internationale

Sullivan alum Nolan Moore still carrying the torch of volunteerism two years on

In 2014, when Nolan Moore was graduating from The Citadel with a major in history, he’d already amassed quite a service resume. His efforts included travels to Sri Lanka and Guatemala, where he worked on English language learning and youth engagement. Those efforts were recognized with a Sullivan Award (and a spotlight in the second issue of Engage).

In the two years since, Moore has served in the Army—he’s currently conducting training at Fort Polk in preparation for an upcoming deployment as a member of the 101st Airborne Division.

Moore’s volunteering projects aren’t always globetrotting affairs—he’s also worked with children in his home state of South Carolina. Through the Greater Tee First Charleston program, he’s helped young people learn life lessons and build character using golf as a launching pad.

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A Transformational Experience

Coker College’s Jubilee Smith earns a Sullivan Award through determination and compassion

Coker College wasn’t originally a part of Jubilee Smith’s life plan. The Greenwood, South Carolina native envisioned herself going somewhere far from home—not the 150 miles to Hartsville, where Coker is located. However, it turned out to be a move that would lead to academic success, a lifelong commitment to serving others, and, finally, a Sullivan Award—she was one of two from Coker for 2016.

Her dedication easily caught the eyes of campus faculty and administrators.

“Jubilee is a conscientious young woman who cares deeply about the quality of life in this community and beyond,” says Tracy Parkinson, Provost and Dean of the college. “Her commitment to service has always been unquestionable as she has sought opportunities to make a difference in the lives of others.”

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Sullivan Superstar

Berry College’s Elly Rusia takes advantage of all the Foundation has to offer and uses it to make a difference

When recent Berry College graduate Elly Rusia thinks back on her experiences with the Sullivan Foundation, she has a little trouble remembering exactly how it all started.

“It’s hard to pinpoint,” she says. “The whole thing just felt so natural.”

Her best guess is a workshop she attended on the Rome, Georgia, campus earlier in her college career. Spud Marshall, the Foundation’s Director of Student Engagement was there along with Alan Webb, a frequent facilitator at the Foundation’s “Ignite” retreats. The purpose of the workshop was introducing students to social entrepreneurship and filling them in about the ways the Foundation could help them.

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Walking the Walk

Through a Sullivan-sponsored program, Randolph-Macon students make a tangible difference in their community

Paper shredding and social engagement might not seem like natural companions. The Sullivan Foundation, however, recognizes that in the fast-developing field of social entrepreneurship just about anything can be leveraged to make a positive difference in the world. A little creativity is all that’s needed.

One shining example of that spirit can be found at Randolph-Macon College in Ashland, Virginia, where students recently helped a non-profit that runs a recreation center for developmentally disabled adults—and soon hopes to provide them with meaningful work in a shredding business that will help fund the center.

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Educating Face-to-Face

North Carolina Wesleyan’s After-school Tutoring Initiative is a big win for education majors and for local school children

The idea that service is an integral part of any solid education is at the core of the Sullivan Foundation’s mission. The Education Department at North Carolina Wesleyan shares that idea, looking for ways to put their future teachers into the classroom long before they graduate.

Of course, student teaching and other forms of in-classroom training are standard for any education major. At Wesleyan, however, associate professor Patricia Brewer identified an opportunity for a new kind of on-the-job training that would fortify her students’ educations while having a tremendous impact on an exceptional group of younger students.

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Sustainable Service

Catawba College’s Center for the Environment has put students to work for the earth for 20 years

Catawba College, like all schools in the Sullivan Foundation network, sees service not just an accompaniment to education but a vital part of it. Those roots run deep in this Salisbury, North Carolina liberal arts haven, and a sharp focus on environmental issues has long been a hallmark of Catawba’s particular brand of service.

The centerpiece of the college’s environmental service programs is its Center for the Environment, which has put students on the front lines of environmental outreach in the Piedmont region of North Carolina now for two full decades. Structuring itself as a model of environmental stewardship and sustainability, the center’s influence in the region can be found in everything from helping to establish the Salisbury Greenway to fostering land conservation, from promoting clean air to advancing solar power.

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Knowing How We Live

Sullivan Faculty Fellow Pradip Malde uses art to inform and to transform his students and the world

Pradip Malde is an artist, professor, and world traveler. His photography is held in collections at the Museum of the Art Institute in Chicago, Princeton University Museum, the Victoria & Albert Museum in London, Yale University Museum, and the Scottish National Portrait Gallery in Edinburgh, among others.

But, for Malde, art is about more than creating beautiful objects. It is inextricably linked to social action.

“I believe that art-making stands to put into a shared place our most personal attitudes and most enduring concerns, and in doing so, is essentially a social practice,” he says. “It follows then, that I am less concerned by art as a self-expressive practice and more interested by the way it helps create bonds and connections.”

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A Treasure in King’s Crown

For 66 years, King University in Bristol, Tennessee, has had a treasure in its crown. Fittingly, her name is Jewel.

Enter through the front door of the King Building, which houses the library and administrative offices, and you’ll find Jewel Bell peering over her desk, likely smiling. Don’t be deceived. Come to see the president without an appointment? She’ll be pleased as punch to make a first-time acquaintance, or thoroughly delighted to see you if you’re an old friend — but nobody gets into the president’s office without her approval.

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