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How Tuition-Free College Works at Berea and ALC

A tuition-free college education isn’t easy to find in the U.S., but if free is all you can afford, look no further than Sullivan Foundation partner schools Berea College and Alice Lloyd College.

These tuition-free colleges, both located in Kentucky, were featured in a recent article on NPR.com. The article explains how their tuition-free work-college models came into existence and how they’ve managed to thrive even as other higher-education institutions have struggled to keep tuition costs under control.

Related: Sullivan Foundation offers college study-abroad opportunity in Scotland for Summer 2020

Berea College was founded by a Presbyterian minister/abolitionist in 1855 as the first racially integrated and coeducational college in the American South. Berea went tuition-free in 1892 because so many students couldn’t afford to pay. In 1920, as NPR reports, its board of trustees created an endowment that has since ballooned to $1.2 billion. The profits from its investments help to educate low-income students, mostly from Appalachia, for free. That means students can graduate with little or no debt while getting a high-quality college education.

NPR notes that it can take decades, even up to 75 years, for an endowment like Berea’s to be able to fully fund a tuition-free college education. When Alice Lloyd founded the institution that bears her name in the early 1900s, she took a different route. For her students, free college actually meant hard work from the start, as they and their families provided the labor to build and staff the campus. Today, Alice Lloyd College boasts about 600 students, mostly from low-income Appalachian families, and 85 percent of the alumni return to live and work in Appalachia.

this photo shows a group of low-income students at one of the country's few tuition-free colleges.

Students enjoy the activities of Giving Day and Opening Convocation at Berea College, one of the country’s few tuition-free colleges.

TaLaura Mathis, who is working on her degree in biology at ALC and then plans to study dentistry, wants to do exactly that. “Where I come from, it’s very poverty-stricken,” Mathis told NPR. “I really want to help blue-collar, hard-working people that just can’t afford dentistry.”

To keep tuition free for students from Alice Lloyd College’s 108-county service area, ALC has “a decent endowment” of around $44 million, NPR reports. ALC also does a lot of fundraising to make sure new buildings are fully funded before construction even begins. Meanwhile, professors teach heavier class loads than they would at other schools and don’t receive tenure.

this photo depicts a graduate of Alice Lloyd College, a prominent tuition-free college in Kentucky

ALC student TaLaura Mathis

As work colleges, Berea and ALC both require students to work at least 10 hours a week. The Atlantic has described Berea’s labor requirements as “work-study on steroids,” with students handling everything from janitorial services to website production and managing volunteer programs. As of the Atlantic’s October 2018 article, 45% of Berea graduates had no debt, while others had an average of less than $7,000 in debt.

ALC’s website states that “no student has ever been turned away from Alice Lloyd College due to an inability to pay.” It adds that ALC “is consistently listed among the nation’s leaders in graduating students with the least amount of average debt.”

Can other schools learn from Berea College and Alice Lloyd College? It depends. NPR suggests the work college model is “best suited for smaller institutions” since it’s not always feasible to create mandatory jobs for students at schools with relatively high enrollments. However, larger schools that want to lower tuition or offer a tuition-free or reduced-tuition education “could try a hybrid of the work-college model,” with smaller working programs offered along with other forms of financial aid.

Alice Lloyd College Recognizes Two Outstanding Servant Leaders With Sullivan Awards

Sullivan Foundation partner school Alice Lloyd College recently recognized Kennedi Alexis Damron and John Mark Driskill with prestigious Sullivan Awards for outstanding servant leadership.

Damron, a former ALC cheerleader and tennis player, received the Mary Mildred Sullivan Award. She teaches at Emmalena Elementary School in Knott County, Kentucky, and has previously won the Alice Lloyd College Scholar Athlete Award and the Alice Lloyd College Leadership Award. Her volunteer activities run the gamut from collecting and distributing food baskets for needy families to delivering gifts and organizing a Veterans Day program at the East Kentucky Veterans Center. Damron has volunteered with the KY River Animal Shelter and Operation Christmas Child and helped distribute Christmas items to more than 500 needy area children in 2014.

Kennedi Alexis Damron

As part of her Read Across America service, Damron partnered with the Kentucky Educational Association to reach out to community schools and celebrate Dr. Seuss’ birthday with classroom reading and activities. She also worked with the Appalachian Regional Hospital during Heart Month, providing free screenings and raising heart health awareness through informational lunches with physician speakers. For Emmalena Elementary Kindness Week in November 2016, she planned activities to promote kindness at her school, including creating a kindness wall and a giving tree.

An ALC statement describes Damron as “a highly organized young lady” with “strong community ties that make her a great teacher.”

“From the abovementioned activities, one can easily recognize that Kennedi is a person of outstanding character, is passionate about making a difference in the lives of others, and impacts her community in a positive way on many levels,” according to ALC. “Her Christian walk and service to others is a high priority in her life and is evident to all who know her. She was a wonderful student ambassador for Alice Lloyd College and a great role model for others.  Kennedi is a very intelligent person and demonstrates a strong work ethic.”

John Mark Driskill

Driskill, recipient of this year’s Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award, is “an exceptional young man who will certainly leave his mark on the world,” the school stated. A member of the ALC Cross Country team and Acoustic Ensemble,  Driskill won the Alice Lloyd College Scholar-Athlete Award and the Campus Spirit Award in 2017 along with many other accolades.

He was hired by ALC as a supervisor over student activities for the goal of improving retention, the school said. He has been active with the Campus Ministries Leadership Team, served as a small-group Bible study leader, interned with the Rural Church Development Alliance and served as a Bethel Mennonite camp counselor.

“John possesses strong leadership traits and high energy while leading,” the school said. “He strives to glorify God in all he does … John enjoys sharing his faith and giving back to his community. He has a strong positive outlook on life.”