Clemson Honors Carly Malcolm, Activist on Behalf of Survivors of Sexual Assault, With Sullivan Award

Carly Malcolm has been awarded the Algernon Sydney Sullivan Student Award at Clemson University for demonstrating Mr. Sullivan’s ideals of heart, mind and conduct as evidenced by “generous and unselfish service to others.”

Malcolm majored in language and international health, an integrated degree program that combines studies in health sciences and a language (Spanish). She minored in gender, sexuality and women’s studies. Both her major and minor programs are offered in the College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities.

Related: Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award recipient Justala Simpson of Huntingdon College prepares for career in ministry

She came to Clemson University from High Point, North Carolina, as one of six National Scholars in 2016. As members of Clemson’s most elite academic merit program, National Scholars receive scholarships that cover tuition, fees and other expenses, in addition to special advising, mentorship and enrichment opportunities, including a funded study-abroad trip after their first year.

Malcolm has combined her interests in health policy and gender equity to improve the Clemson community by addressing issues of sexual assault and domestic violence and support services for survivors. She has gone above and beyond interest and advocacy, taking action on behalf of others, the university stated in a press release.

“Receiving this award is very meaningful to me because it recognizes the importance of improving resources for survivors of sexual violence at Clemson,” Malcolm said. “I have been honored to work alongside many passionate and talented students and staff who are dedicated to serving this community and making Clemson a safer, more equitable environment for all.”

During her time at Clemson, Malcolm was involved in student government, UNICEF and several Honors College programs. She studied in Stellenbosch, South Africa, and visited other cities—such as Durban and Johannesburg—while she was there. In 2018, Malcolm completed a summer internship with the American Public Health Association in Washington. As part of her major, she also studied in Córdoba, Argentina, and completed an internship at a hospital there.

Related: Steffi Kong, recipient of the Mary Mildred Sullivan Award at Converse College, “excels at everything she does”

As a senior, Malcolm took part in a yearlong Creative Inquiry undergraduate research project called “Stories of Refuge, Detention and Hospitality.” In the program led by professors Angela Naimou and Joseph Mai, each student met with someone being held at the Stewart Detention Center in Lumpkin, Georgia, and listened to personal stories about immigration and becoming a refugee. The students later presented their findings at a symposium.

Malcolm said she is especially proud of the work she has done at Clemson as a member of It’s On Us, a student-led movement to end sexual assault on college campuses, and as an interpersonal violence prevention intern in the Office of Access and Equity. As part of her internship, she raised awareness about issues of consent, sexual assault and bystander intervention and helped provide educational programming on those topics.

“As an alumna, I will continue to support the movement to improve survivor resources at Clemson and look forward to seeing the progress that will be made,” Malcolm said.

In the coming months, Malcolm will begin a Lead for North Carolina government fellowship. The program, run by the School of Government at UNC-Chapel Hill, also a Sullivan Foundation partner school, aims to cultivate the next generation of public service leaders. Malcolm will work with the Register of Deeds office in Guilford County, helping develop a new Community Innovators Lab. She described the project as a creativity incubator for planning, developing and delivering knowledge and resources in her hometown.

Eventually Malcolm plans to pursue a master’s degree in public health.

This article has been edited slightly from the original version appearing on the Clemson University website.

 

Dewey and Barbara Trogdon, Berenice Fuentes Juarez Honored With Sullivan Awards from Guilford College

Sullivan Foundation partner school Guilford College has presented the prestigious Algernon Sydney Sullivan Awards for 2020 to Dewey and Barbara Trogdon from the Guilford community and Berenice Fuentes Juarez from the student body.

Dewey Trogdon is a Guilford College alumnus who graduated in 1958. He and Barbara, his wife, have lived their lives rooted in working-class values formed as children growing up through the Great Depression and World War II. Those formative years informed their strong work ethic, generosity and focus on family, friends and individuals in need of a hand from time to time. Together, Dewey and Barbara represent grace, giving, friendship and a sense of community, according to a Guilford College press release.

Related: Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award winner Justala Simpson of Huntingdon College prepares for a career in ministry

Berenice Fuentes Juarez, the oldest daughter of Mexican parents, identifies as Mexican-American and is a first-generation college student—now a Guilford alumna. Raised in Oakland, California, she double majored in public health and biology with a minor in Spanish, all while building an exceptional record of leadership and service at Guilford.

Juarez worked with Soy un Lider, an annual college preparation and empowerment conference for Latinx and refugee students hosted by Guilford College, and Latinx Impact, a community-based program for high-school students, as well as campus organization Hispanos Unidos de Guilford. She also served as a research assistant for 200- and 300-level biology courses taught by Professor Melanie Lee-Brown.

Dewey and Barbara Trogdon
Dewey Trogdon is the former CEO and chairman of Cone Mills and past president of the American Textile Manufacturers Institute. He has been a mentor to many in the business world.

He also is an amateur historian on two counts: about the former Atlantic and Yadkin Railway and the town of Summerfield, N.C., where he and Barbara were born. As a young volunteer firefighter, Dewey used his mechanical skills to help build many of the original fire trucks for the Summerfield Volunteer Fire Department. He also served as an assistant chief of the department and provided care for people injured in accidents and fires when emergency services were scarce.

Related: Steffi Kong, winner of the Mary Mildred Sullivan Award at Converse College, “excels at everything she does.”

In a letter to the editor of the Greensboro News and Record in 2000, Dewey, a Korean War veteran, wrote: “For me, Korea was the beginning of an aversion toward shedding our blood and national wealth and committing young Americans to oblivion as a result of uncertain national goals.”

Dewey graduated from Guilford with a bachelor’s degree in economics and completed additional study at Harvard University, the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, and the University of Virginia. He has received Guilford’s Alumni Excellence Award and Charles C. Hendricks ’40 Distinguished Service Award. He and Barbara have been loyal benefactors to Guilford College and are members of the Macon Society (total gifts of more than $1 million) and Francis T. King Society (with a planned gift). Dewey served as a member of the Guilford College Board of Trustees from 1980 to 2004 and has been a Trustee Emeritus since then.

Barbara and Dewey Trogdon, community recipients of the Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award for 2020 at Guilford College.

When reflecting on contributions both of his parents have made to Guilford and the larger Triad community, their son Mark Trogdon, a 1983 graduate, said their acts of service have followed “a basic tenant of, it’s what you do to help others/organizations because you believe it is necessary to help them.”

Mark added that for decades his mother Barbara “has provided financial support to numerous hard-working people striving to create a sustainable existence and promising future for themselves and their families. She has done this without fanfare, driven by a genuine goal of simply helping others while maintaining their dignity and integrity … not drawing attention upon herself or those in need,” he said. “She did this when we had minimal family resources and later on in life when they (my parents) had more to share.”

“I am extraordinarily proud of my parents and (of) Guilford for recognizing them,” he said.

Berenice Fuentes Juarez
In 2019, Juarez was honored by the N.C. Campus Compact with its annual Community Impact Service Award, given to students who demonstrate a deep commitment to community involvement and an ability to inspire their peers. Juarez was one of only 22 students statewide to receive the Community Impact Service Award last year, first presented by the Campus Compact in 2006.

The fact that Juarez has received that kind of recognition, including this year’s Sullivan Award, is no surprise to her biology professor, Dr. Melanie Lee-Brown. Lee-Brown met and first taught Juarez when, in her sophomore year, Juarez enrolled in her Scientific Inquiry: Bioterrorism class. At that time, the Scientific Inquiry course was part of core course work for biology majors, Lee-Brown said. She described the class as the “first introduction to self-generated research” for students in the major.

Related: Davidson College bestows Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award on student with a heart for the homeless

Typically, students in the class are organized in groups of four to design a research project around a prompt from the professor. “She (Juarez) did really well,” Lee-Brown said.  “[W]ithin her group, I recognized that she was a leader. She was one that was always working towards them setting goals and getting those goals accomplished within their group. And beyond that, she was somebody that really seemed to care about the folks in her group.”

Juarez is not only “very service-minded,” but also a broad thinker, Lee-Brown said. She is someone with the ability to bring people of different backgrounds together and “help to get people excited about the work. That was both inside and outside the classroom,” Lee-Brown said, whether Juarez was rallying classmates to volunteer with a Soy un Lider conference or ensuring biology students had access to extra lab time and other resources they needed.

“She faced a lot of adversity in her personal life on top of all of this,” Lee-Brown noted, “so it’s even more amazing what she ended up accomplishing in her time here.”

“She’s been through a lot and she has a lot of strength,” the professor added. “I think she has a lot more strength than she thinks she does at some points.”

After reflecting on Juarez’s growth during her studies at Guilford—as a leader, a female scientist and a young woman of color juggling many responsibilities—Lee-Brown summed up her thoughts about her former student and advisee: “She’s an excellent combination of strength and softness, and outward responsibility, and caring and maturity. “This (Sullivan) award was perfect for her, because it did highlight so much that is Berenice.”

If the academic year had concluded as planned for Guilford’s Class of 2020, the graduates would have been joined in celebration on the campus quad last month by this year’s Sullivan Award recipients. Instead, with spring commencement plans halted by the global COVID-19 pandemic, current plans call for all three 2020 Sullivan Award honorees to be recognized at Guilford’s 2021 commencement.

This article was edited slightly from the original version appearing on the Guilford College website.

 

The Run for Black Lives: Josh Nadzam Raises Funds for NAACP in 26-Mile Marathon

Josh Nadzam, a 2012 Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award winner and graduate of the University of Kentucky, has never been the kind of person who runs away from problems—he runs to solve them. Raised by a single mother in the housing projects of Pittsburgh, Nadzam used his talent and skills as a scholar-athlete to escape grinding poverty, winning a full scholarship with the Wildcats’ track and field team and becoming one of the top milers in the SEC.

More recently he ran to bring awareness to another problem: police brutality and racial inequity. Nadzam, a social entrepreneur and cofounder of On the Move Art Studio in Lexington, Kentucky, ran 26 miles from Lexington to Frankfort, Kentucky, in a fundraiser for the Kentucky NAACP on Friday, June 19. Despite conceiving and organizing the event in less than a week, he ended up raising more than $7,000 from 130 donors. Prior to the marathon, we asked Nadzam to talk about his commitment to social justice, the Black Lives Matter movement and his belief that “an injustice to one is an injustice to all.”

Related: How Josh Nadzam outran poverty and uses art to change kids’ lives

Sullivan Foundation: What inspired you to take this on? How did you get the idea?

Josh Nadzam: Racism, discrimination and the injustices experienced by black Americans are completely unacceptable, and I want to do everything I can to play my role in dismantling the systemic structures that perpetuate these issues. I want to be an ally, fight for social justice, and make our country welcoming and fair for all Americans. I’m always trying to think of various ways I can effect change, so in addition to policy changes, protests, and other forms of activism, I believe each one of us has a set of skills we can use to contribute to the cause. Mine happens to be running. So I thought I could raise awareness for this issue and also raise funds for an organization that is constantly fighting this battle by running from my home city to our capitol in Kentucky.

this p

Josh Nadzam crosses the finish line in the Wesley Waddle 5K Run in 2017.

Sullivan Foundation: What does the Black Lives Matter movement mean to you personally?

Nadzam: To me, it is an expression that the black community feels like their lives do not matter as much as other lives. It’s a rallying cry to draw attention to deep, systemic issues that have existed for centuries. One of my favorite quotes is, “An injustice to one is an injustice to all.” So, while I’ll never be able to relate to what it is like to be black in America, if anyone hurts in America, then I hurt, too. Their pain is my pain. We’re all in this together, so I won’t rest until we fix this.

Sullivan Foundation: I know you’re a physically fit guy, but 26 miles! Wow! Will this be a breeze for you, or do you see it as a serious challenge?

Nadzam: It’s definitely going to be challenging, but, fortunately, I’ve run a few marathons before which are 26.2 miles, so I at least have an idea of what it’ll feel like. But it’ll still be hard—and very hot that day!

Sullivan Foundation: Do you have other people running with you?

Nadzam: There is at least one other person who is going to run the whole way with me. A few others have expressed interest in running a portion of it with me. I wish we could have a ton of people run, but, unfortunately, there isn’t really a safe route to run from Lexington to Frankfort with a large crowd.

Sullivan Foundation: As more and more young people begin to join this protest movement, what do you think they need to know to serve as effective allies?

Nadzam: I think what we all need to do as effective allies is to listen, be humble, approach these situations without defensiveness, and recognize as white people that we have privileges that allow us to navigate America in a much different and safer way than people of color. Also, this fight is a marathon, not a sprint. While it is “trending” right now, this issue is going to take decades to resolve. We need everyone to get engaged and stay engaged long after this conversation fades away from the national spotlight.

Postscript: Ten people joined Nadzam for part of the 26-mile run with one person, Gavin Galanes, completing it with him. “The sun was unforgiving, and there was no shade the entire way,” Nadzam later posted on Instagram. “I got pretty sick once I was home, but it was all worth it.”

Sullivan Award Winner Justala Simpson of Huntingdon College Prepares for Career in Ministry

By Su Ofe

Justala Faith Simpson, a 2020 graduate of Sullivan Foundation partner school Huntingdon College, was honored with the prestigious Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award in May. The award is presented annually to a Huntingdon College senior who exemplifies the definition of “nobility of character” as established by the Sullivan Foundation.

Simpson, a religion major from Montgomery, Ala., was active in and held leadership roles for Huntingdon Campus Ministries and the Huntingdon Leadership Academy. She was also active in her sorority, Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Inc., and served on the executive council of Huntingdon College’s Student Government Association, as a Huntingdon Ambassador and Student Recruiter, and as a member of the Huntingdon Concert Choir, among other organizations. Passionate about youth and teaching ministries, she interned with the Huntingdon Leadership Academy and with First United Methodist Church-Montgomery.

Related: Steffi Kong, winner of the Mary Mildred Sullivan Award at Converse College, “excels at everything she does”

Simpson is a local and denominational leader in the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church, serving as the youth liaison on the planning committee for General Conference 2020 and as youth president of the AMEZ Church. She also served on the planning committee for the denomination-wide Midwinter Gathering for Christian Education for Youth and Young Adults.

“I have seen that her academic abilities, astute theological reasoning, wide-range of ministry experiences, and gifts for leadership demonstrate the nobility of character and fine spiritual qualities recognized by the Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award,” said Huntingdon religion professor Dr. Diane Abernethy.

The daughter of two pastors, the Reverends Harold and Lessie Simpson, Simpson also feels called to ministry as her vocation. She will enter seminary study at Candler School of Theology at Emory University this fall, where she received a full-tuition Presidential Scholarship to continue her education, discernment and development as a leader in the church.

Simpson is a 2017 graduate of Brewbaker Technology Magnet High School. At Huntingdon, she was inducted into Sigma Sigma Sigma, Theta Alpha Kappa, and Order of Omega honor societies. A summa cum laude graduate, she received the Margaret Read Scholarship Medal upon graduation with her Bachelor of Arts degree. This spring, she was also recognized with the Louise Panigot Award as the senior religion major “who holds the greatest promise for scholarly achievement in the field of philosophy and in the academic study of religion.”

This story was edited from the original version appearing on the Huntingdon College website.

Olivia Gouldin, Kyle Hooven and Barry Schnoor Honored With Sullivan Awards at Shenandoah University

Sullivan Foundation partner school Shenandoah University has awarded this year’s Algernon Sydney Sullivan Awards to seniors Olivia “Livy” Gouldin and Kyle Hooven and to Director of Physical Plant Barry Schnoor, M.S.

Each year, the Algernon Sydney Sullivan Awards are presented at 70 colleges and universities across the American south. First awarded in 1890, the award goes to individuals who are committed to creating positive change.

Olivia Gouldin

Olivia “Livy” Gouldin
Gouldin majored in Spanish and exercise science and earned a certificate in Religious Diversity and Leadership in the Professions. She was a tutor for biology and Spanish and received the Tutor of the Year Award in 2019. Additionally, she was the recipient of the inaugural Exercise Science Community Spirit Award in 2019. She was also inducted into the Omicron Delta Kappa leadership honor society.

During her time at Shenandoah, Gouldin volunteered at the Frederick Rescue Mission and the Care Net pregnancy center, both in Frederick, Maryland, and she also served on mission trips in the United States, Honduras and Guatemala. Additionally, she provided interpreting services for the Sinclair Health Clinic in Winchester and worked with Habitat for Humanity. This past summer, Gouldin served in an internship where she assisted healthcare providers by providing translation services and attending to the cultural practices and values of patients. She then took this experience and taught her fellow exercise science students how to attend to religious and cultural diversity in healthcare.

One of Gouldin’s five nominators said her “incomparable sense of compassion has been even more apparent to me during the coronavirus-induced isolation … as she has reached out to friends who are struggling and has repeatedly shown grace.” Another nominator said, “It is her humble nature and her ability to always have a positive attitude despite challenges that help Livy embody what it is to live nobly and beautifully. Her very spirit and enthusiasm for life are contagious.”

Kyle Hooven

Kyle Hooven
Hooven, a sociology and psychology major, exemplifies the Shenandoah University spirit by seeking to create communities of compassion, responsibility, advocacy and justice. One nominator said that Hooven thinks about “how to make the world a better place for others who are not like him.” Hooven’s nominators included faculty and staff who recognized him for his exceptional character and his strong connections with classroom and co-curricular activities. Hooven was active across campus with leadership roles in the Mosaic Center for Diversity and in the First-Year Seminar, where he served as a mentor, head mentor and orientation leader. He also partnered with the Four Diamonds organization to raise money to fight childhood cancer.

After traveling to Uganda and Rwanda on a Global Experiential Learning trip, Hooven discerned international service as a vocational journey. One nominator said, “He takes personal responsibility to make the world a better place, a more just place for marginalized communities.” Another nominator said, “I have seen how he encourages other students, welcomes new student employees and creatively merges his sense of social justice with strategic programming.” His final nominator said, “Everyone deserves to have a person like Kyle Hooven in their life. When I see him, my face lights up because he brings joy wherever he goes.”

Barry Schnoor

Barry Schnoor
Barry Schnoor is the staff recipient of the Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award, in honor of his compassion and dedication. He regularly engages with students, learns about their needs and ensures their comfort. A nominator said, “Barry has been one of my biggest supporters and continually goes out of his way to better the lives of Shenandoah students.”

One residential student described Schnoor as a caring and compassionate individual who makes sure that their residence hall room is accessible and feels “better than home.” Schnoor is a supporter of academic programs and events on campus through his presence and kind words. One nominator said, “He leads by example and leads with his heart, and Shenandoah would not be complete without him.”

Throughout his tenure at Shenandoah, Schnoor has stepped in during emergencies, both related to Physical Plant and due to family situations in other divisions. He’s been a team player taking on roles that include mentoring and supervising students on international trips. A student nominator said: “Barry truly embodies Shenandoah’s values of community and leadership. He handles situations with a grace and ease that is both inspiring and exemplary of true noble character.”

This story has been edited slightly from the original version appearing on the Shenandoah University website.

 

Rhodes College Presents Two Students, Community Leader With Sullivan Awards

Sullivan Foundation partner school Rhodes College has conferred the Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award and the Mary Mildred Sullivan Award on two students and one community member for the 2019-2020 school year.

Maggie Palopoli
Maggie Palopoli, a biology and molecular biology major and religious studies minor from Covington, La., has dedicated her time at Rhodes to service and love for members of the community around her.

As a board member for the Rhodes chapter of the Food Recovery Network, Palopoli has demonstrated her commitment to feeding the Memphis community while reducing food waste. As a former Kinney coordinator doing work with interfaith organizations in Memphis, she helped build relationships with—and expose students to—the work of many community partners in Memphis. As a Resident Assistant, she ensured the safety of other students while serving as a source of emotional support for her residents.

Related: Steffi Kong, recipient of the Mary Mildred Sullivan Award at Converse College, “excels at everything she does”

During her semester abroad, Palopoli focused on researching how the Italian healthcare system cares for the Muslim migrant population in Bologna and how the system could be improved to treat patients more ethically in populations of varying religious and cultural backgrounds.

Palopoli’s peers said her incredible compassion for everyone she meets is obvious to all who interact with her and that her kind nature shows in her commitment to the Rhodes community and to Memphis at large.

Saneela Tameez
Saneela Tameez, a psychology major and political science minor from Memphis, Tenn., has been a strong advocate for an inclusive campus focused on the needs of Rhodes students. Her work with the Muslim Student Association has helped bring awareness to issues the Muslim community faces.

A member of the Class Council, Tameez coordinated campus events including Pizza and Politics discussions, where she used her diplomatic skills to help facilitate scholarly conversations on campus. She is passionate about justice and fairness for those most vulnerable and truly cares about those around her.

Related: Davidson College bestows Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award on student with a heart for the homeless

Tameez has served as a Peer Assistant and has mentored new students and gone out of her way to ensure that all students feel like Rhodes is their home. Her peers describe her as a ray of light, a role model and an advocate in every sphere she is involved in on campus. They said Tameez tilted the scales of Rhodes culture to be more loving, considerate, and vocal to injustices.

Aubrey Howard
Aubrey Howard, the recipient of the Sullivan community award, has always made himself available to serve his alma mater. A mentor to many Rhodes students and alumni, the Memphis resident has always been willing to share career and networking advice, having had extensive experience in banking, commercial development, non-profit leadership and city government.

Active in the Rhodes Alumni network, Aubrey served as a member of the Alumni Executive Board and as the inaugural president of the Black Alumni Chapter, providing extraordinary leadership and guidance to the college in its goals to become more diverse and inclusive. He recently served as a member of the college’s 20-30-50 Planning Committee and has expanded the college’s network of support in both local and national circles.

Rhodes College President Hass said, “We are grateful for Aubrey Howard’s courage, resilience, energy and leadership. He has been a friend and mentor to generations of Rhodes students. His love for his alma mater is visible to all who know him.”

Related: University of Alabama Sullivan Award winner Malik Seals is on a quest to cure multiple sclerosis

 

Steffi Kong, Winner of the Sullivan Award at Converse College, “Excels at Everything She Does”

Shi Qing “Steffi” Kong, a senior at Sullivan Foundation partner school Converse College, is no stranger to deadly viruses. As a child in Singapore, she survived SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) at the age of 7 and the H1N1 virus (better known as the swine flu) when she was 10.

“Of course, I am worried about getting [COVID-19],” she told GoUpstate.com in early May. “But I joke with my friends: Third time is a charm. Either I become a victim or maybe I potentially become superhuman.”

Related: Honors student who fed thousands and rape survivor advocate earn Sullivan Awards at The Citadel

We’re betting the latter. But whatever happens with the coronavirus – and here’s hoping she doesn’t get it – Kong will likely become a big success. Now a standout student-athlete and the Converse tennis team’s No. 1 singles player since 2016, Kong is also the recipient of the Sullivan Foundation’s prestigious Mary Mildred Sullivan Award for 2020. With her degrees in biochemistry and psychology in hand, Kong plans to attend medical school and ultimately practice psychiatry in the U.S.

“She’s a gem,” Katie Mancebo, Kong’s tennis coach at Converse, told GoUpstate.com. “I’ve never met someone who is harder-working or more disciplined. She just excels at everything she does. She’s probably every coach’s dream as a student-athlete.”

In April, Kong became the first student in Converse history to win the Murphy Osborne Scholar-Athlete Award, the highest academic award for a student-athlete in the Conference Carolinas.

“I am grateful to be given the opportunity to study in the United States and be able to have a different experience outside of continuing my education in Singapore,” Kong said. “It’s because of generous scholarships that I am able to attend Converse and accomplish great milestones.”

Related: Imani Belton, Gabriel Dias receive Sullivan Awards at Winthrop University

Sullivan Award winner Steffi Kong has presented her research at two national conferences and one international conference.

Kong has presented her research and publications at two national conferences and one international conference—a rare privilege for an undergraduate student. She made biophysics presentations at the Materials Research Society Fall Meeting & Exhibit in Boston in 2019 and the South Carolina IDeA Networks of Biomedical Research Excellence Science Symposium in Columbia, S.C. in 2020.

She also presented her psychology research at the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies Annual Convention in Atlanta in 2019. Dr. Marie LePage, one of Kong’s psychology professors at Converse, collaborated with her on the presentation. “On our way driving home from the Atlanta conference, she just lit up like a Christmas tree,” LePage told Conference Carolinas in a profile on Kong. “That’s special for a student to get that jazzed about therapy. She’s just genuinely passionate about it. She wants to be the best she can be. I’ve taught thousands of students, and she ranks among my top five in terms of being an advanced scholar. But when it comes to passion, she absolutely ranks No. 1.”

Related: UA Sullivan Award winner Malik Seals on a quest to cure multiple sclerosis

After her freshman year at Converse, Kong returned home for the summer and volunteered at a mental health institute. After her sophomore year, she interned at the Kidney Foundation in Singapore. Her senior honors thesis was titled, “Stress, Depression and Anxiety: The College Student Dilemma,” with a strong focus on the differences between student-athletes and non-student-athletes.

“I know she is very interested in medicine,” LePage said in the Conference Carolinas interview. “Whether she goes into psychiatry or general medicine … she will be exceptional.”

 

Honors Student Who Fed Thousands and Rape Survivor Advocate Receive Sullivan Awards at The Citadel

Sullivan Foundation partner school The Citadel has named two recipients of the prestigious Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award: An honors student who has provided thousands of meals to the food-insecure and stood up for Native Americans and a professor who has advocated for survivors of rape and domestic violence.

Cadet Olivia Jones (pictured above) is an Honors Program student at The Citadel majoring in political science with a concentration in military affairs. Jones also serves as the Papa Company Commander, maintaining company morale while adhering to the highest ethical standards. Jones has demonstrated her commitment as a servant leader throughout her time at The Citadel, creating a Summer Food Service Program providing 3,700 meals to low-income families. She also has promoted quality of life initiatives for Native American families in New Mexico, providing community training for the most vulnerable in those communities.

Related: “The Beloved Community”: Alexus Cumbie’s poetry, policy and passion for changemaking

this photo shows a smiling Kristen Hefner, who won the Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award for faculty members at The Citadel

Dr. Kristen Hefner received the Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award for her work in the areas of victim advocacy and domestic violence education.

Dr. Kristen Hefner, a professor in the Department of Criminal Justice, has distinguished herself as a teacher-scholar, spearheading community outreach initiatives in the areas of victim advocacy and domestic violence education and creating rich service-learning opportunities for her students. For her service-learning project with People Against Rape, a community non-profit, Hefner and her student were awarded the Good Citizen Award by the Charleston County Sheriff’s Office. Sheriff Al Cannon and community victim advocates seek to continue Hefner’s humanitarian work, with her students having created over 200 uplifting and encouraging cards for survivors who have been impacted by violence.

In partnership with the Algernon Sydney Sullivan Foundation, the Citadel presents the Algernon Sydney Sullivan Awards annually to a student and faculty member in recognition of high thought and noble endeavor.

This story has been edited from the original version on The Citadel’s website.

Related: Ole Miss honors five changemakers with Algernon Sydney Sullivan Awards

 

Davidson College Bestows Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award on Student With a Heart for the Homeless

A Davidson College graduating senior with a heart for helping the homeless and people in crisis received the Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award for 2020.

Emily Duval earned her degree in Literacy and Multilingual Education at Davidson College, a Sullivan Foundation partner school. During her time at Davidson, Duval helped homeless women and children at the Crisis Assistance Ministries and the Salvation Army Center of Hope in Charlotte, N.C.

Related: Paxton Peacock, Natalie Conboy and Chris Nunn receive Algernon Sydney Sullivan Awards at Auburn

She also befriended and treated people in financial crisis “with dignity, listening to their struggles with compassion,” the nomination letter read.

Duval was a Bonner Scholar, a Davidson College honor based on a student’s commitment to enriching the community through volunteering. She was also a QuestBridge Scholar and helped raise awareness on campus about socioeconomic diversity while providing support for high-achieving low-income students.

Additionally, Duval taught children in the LEARN Works after-school program at the Ada Jenkins Center and as a summer servant leader intern with Freedom Schools. She has volunteered at the Lula Bell Houston resource center and was co-coordinator for Be the Match/Project Life and for Room in the Inn.

Related: Sullivan Scholar Sara Busaleh: Serving others “gave me hope when I was hopeless”

She also served on the leadership team of the Davidson ecumenical weekly college worship service, leading prayers and reflections and using “her amazing voice to lead music and to build a spiritual community of inclusion, kindness and grace,” a nominator wrote.

Among her many accolades, Duval received the George Gladstone Memorial Award in 2019. This award recognizes rising seniors “exhibiting high potential for service to mankind as indicated by leadership, service and academic record.”

Rose Denor, Tanner Shivley Earn Algernon Sydney Sullivan Awards at Carson-Newman University

Sullivan Foundation partner school Carson-Newman University announced that Rose Denor and Tanner Shivley are recipients of the 2020 Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award. The recognition is the highest honor the University presents to students.

Scroll down to watch the video presentation of the awards.

A resident of Chattanooga, Denor has pursued a major in history. A Bonner Scholar, Denor has also served as a student development intern this past year for the University’s Center for Community Engagement. The opportunity allowed her to lead the Bonner Scholars Program. An immigrant from Haiti, Denor has had a heart for also helping immigrants and refugees in the community.

photo of Rose Denor, recipient of the Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award at Carson-Newman University

Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award winner Rose Denor “cares about making sure that all the people she knows feel seen, loved and valued.”

“[Rose] is a servant leader,” said Bonner Scholars Coordinator Gabby Valentine. “She cares about making sure that all the people she knows feel seen, loved and valued. She goes the extra mile, not because it makes her look good, but because it needs to be done.”

Shivley (pictured at top) is a youth athletics and recreation management major from Fall Branch. “Tanner is one of our hardest working students in our Faith & Justice Scholars Program,” said Dave McNeely, coordinator of the program. “Over the four years he’s been here, he’s always exemplified what it means to just jump in when something needs to be done.”

Related: Sullivan Scholar Sara Busaleh: Serving others “gave me hope when I was hopeless”

Shivley has also helped with tutoring and after-school recreation for elementary school children through the WOW Ministry at First Baptist Church of Jefferson City. A Niswonger Scholar, he’s been credited with always being quick to help those in need.

Both Denor and Shivley have also been active in Jefferson County’s Journey Program, which offers extra support and intervention for high school students.

“We are grateful for Rose and Tanner and all the ways they have represented our university,” said University President Charles A. Fowler. “In their time at Carson-Newman, they both have truly demonstrated what it means to be servant leaders.”

Related: University of Alabama Sullivan Award winner Malik Seals is on a quest to cure multiple sclerosis

The New York Southern Society established the Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award in 1890 to honor Sullivan, an Indiana native and Manhattan attorney who was considered a living example of genteel spirit and Christian compassion. The awards, which are donated by the foundation that bears his name, are granted at 68 colleges and universities to graduating seniors, one female and one male, who “excel in high ideals of living, in fine spiritual qualities, and in generous and unselfish service to others.”

This article was edited slightly from the original version appearing on the Carson-Newman University website.